Repair & Rejuvenate

Changing our bodies is hard work. Fat loss, muscle gain, athletic performance, shape change, and rehabilitation all require workouts that are challenging on many levels. Yet, doing more is not always the answer. In fact it can work against us if our ability to recover is overwhelmed by the amount of exercise you we doing. Working in and building energy with recovery is just as important as working out with resistance training, cardiovascular training, and corrective exercise. [1]  There are many ways to work in, and active and passive rest are useful and have their place, the most powerful of these is without a question sleep. [2]

Sleep deprivation not only makes us tired, but it negatively affects every physiological system in our body. [3] There is a strong connection between the recovery effects of sleep and the immune system, emotional well-being, cognitive functioning, and neuromuscular performance. [4]  This power of sleep starts in the bedroom.

 

The Bedroom: Creating a Sleeping Sanctuary

To reap maximal restorative benefits, we must create an optimal sleeping sanctuary. Use the following suggestions to get the most out of yours:

  • environment, as our sleeping and waking patterns are dependent on our circadian rhythms. A few hundred years ago everything got dark when the sun went down, and we all went to sleep as darkness fell. Now with artificial light we can unnaturally stay awake, disturbing our circadian rhythms.

    • Keep lights low after the sun goes down

    • Avoid screens or at least use screen dimmers for several hours before bed

    • Use calming colors and textures in your bedroom.

    • Try going to bed by 9:30 or 10pm for maximal hormonal output.

    • Blackout curtains can be helpful in areas with street lights or other light outside.

 

  • Getting in the Mood:

A relaxing bedtime routine will help your body wind down and make falling asleep easier. Do the same things in the same order to create a sense of winding down. If you’re having trouble with this, try implementing the following approaches:

    • Meditation

    • Making a list of stressors to be dealt with the next day

    • A Warm Magnesium Salt Bath

    • Reading a relaxing book

    • Qui Gong or Tai Chi

    • Stretching

    • Massage

    • Music with a tempo slower than the heart rate


Form and Function: Sleeping posture is critical for proper alignment of the bones, airway, muscles, and organs. A properly designed pillow like the Noble Pillow can help you achieve this sleeping posture. Cultivating optimal sleeping posture has many positive downstream effects:

  • Lengthens joint lifespan
  • Decreases and ameliorates pain
  • Contributes to optimal body temperature for recovery response
  • Works in both preventive and rehabilitative applications
  • Accelerates healing time from injury and surgery
  • Improves waking postural alignment for optimal functional movement
  • Enhances sleep quality by providing dynamic and comfortable body positions with organic materials and quality craftsmanship
  • Customizable for postural progressions

 

 The Noble Head Pillow: Custom, Ergonomic, Organic, Adjustable

The Noble Head Pillow: Custom, Ergonomic, Organic, Adjustable

 The Noble Lower Body Pillow: Ergonomic, Organic, Adjustable

The Noble Lower Body Pillow: Ergonomic, Organic, Adjustable

 
 
 

 

References:

1. Working in Versus Working Out: When Working Out Can Be Bad for Your Health by Leigh Brandon The Check Institute

2. Dr. Quiet’s Three Types of Rest by Leigh Brandon. Chek Institute The Check Institute

3. The Impact of Sleep Deprivation on Hormones and Metabolism Authors: Eve Van Cauter, PhD; Kristen Knutson, PhD; Rachel Leproult, PhD; Karine Spiegel, PhD Medscape Neurology

4. The Role of Sleeping: Performance and Recovery of Athletes. South African Journal for Research in Sport. Jan 2012 Racheal Venter Stellenbosch University